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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Changes in streamflow following timber harvest in southwestern Oregon found in the catalog.

Changes in streamflow following timber harvest in southwestern Oregon

R. Dennis Harr

Changes in streamflow following timber harvest in southwestern Oregon

by R. Dennis Harr

  • 242 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station in Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forest management -- Oregon,
  • Logging -- Oregon,
  • Watersheds -- Oregon

  • Edition Notes

    StatementR. Dennis Harr, Richard L. Fredriksen, Jack Rothacher
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper PNW -- 249
    ContributionsFredriksen, Richard L., joint author, Rothacher, Jack, joint author, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.), United States. Forest Service
    The Physical Object
    Pagination22 p. :
    Number of Pages22
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13564439M

    Regionally, climate change is increasing fire frequency, elevating the importance of understanding historically frequent-fire regimes. We use cross-dated fire-scars to characterize historical fire return intervals, seasonality, and relationships with climate beginning in CE for 13 sites representative of southwestern Oregon dry forests.   Fredriksen, R. (). Erosion and sedimentation following road construction and timber harvest on unstable soils in three small western Oregon watersheds. U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Research Paper PNW Portland, OR: U.S. Department. Fredriksen, R. ().

    Forest fuels and predicted fire behavior in the first 5 years after a bark beetle outbreak with and without timber harvest (Project INT-EM-F) [Chapter 12]. In: Potter, Kevin M.; Conkling, Barbara L., eds. Forest health monitoring: national status, trends, and analysis The mean monthly streamflow in Swiftcurrent Creek, downstream of the dam, for the year period of record (USGS ), is presented in Table 1. Table 1. Mean monthly streamflow in Swiftcurrent Creek, downstream of the dam, for the year period of record (USGS ). March April May June July Aug Sept Oct cubic meters per second.

    Cambridge Core - Natural Resource Management, Agriculture, Horticulture and forestry - Global Deforestation - by Christiane Runyan. One study showed that in Oregon and Washington, for example, 20% of nonindustrial forest owners were solely interested in timber production, while 40% had recreation or other nontimber interests, and 40% had both timber and nontimber interests. 4 Of forest owners who possessed exclusively recreation and other nontimber interests, they tended to.


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Changes in streamflow following timber harvest in southwestern Oregon by R. Dennis Harr Download PDF EPUB FB2

Changes in Streamflow Following Timber Harvest in Southwestern Oregon (Classic Reprint) [Harr, Robert Dennis] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Changes in Streamflow Following Timber Harvest in Southwestern Oregon (Classic Reprint)Cited by: Changes in streamflow following timber harvest in southwestern Oregon. Portland, Or.: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook. If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. However, even with forest cover reduced by 53%, Wilk et al.

() failed to detect any significant change in mean annual flows in the Nam Pong River Basin (12, km 2) of Northeast Thailand. Long-term monthly average discharge varied from 3 to m 3 s −1 during and from 2 to m 3 s −1 during (Fig.

4(b)). Changes in streamflow following timber harvest in southwestern Oregon. USDA Forest Service Research Paper PNW Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Portland, Oregon.

Harr, R.D. Potential for augmenting water yield through forest practices in western Washington and western Oregon. Water Resource Bulletin 19(3)   R. Harr, R.L. Fredriksen, J. RothacherChanges in streamflow following timber harvest in southwestern Oregon US Department of Agriculture Forest Service, General Technical Report PNW () 22 ppCited by: Fredriksen, R.L., Moore, D.G., and Norris, L.A.

The impact of timber harvest, fertilization, and herbicide treatment on stream water quality in western Oregon and Washington, pp. – In: Proceedings of the 4th North American Forest Soils Conference on Forest Soils and Forest Land Management. Laval Univ.

Press, Quebec. Google ScholarCited by: 8. Harr, R.D. Effects of streamflow in the rain-dominated portion of the Pacific Northwest. In Proceedings of the Workshop on Scheduling Timber Harvest for Hydrologic Concerns, Portland, OR, USA, 27–29 November [Google Scholar] Troendle, C.A.; King, R.M.

The effect of timber harvest on the Fool Creek watershed, 30 years later. Water by: 1. Excerpt from Changes in Streamflow Following Timber Harvest in Southwestern Oregon Changes in size of annual and seasonal yields and instantaneous peak flows were determined on three small, experimental watersheds following three silvicultural methods of timber harvest.

Changes are related to changes in forest hydrologic : Capa Comum. temperature changes following headwater forest management in western Oregon. American sources in forested headwater streams following timber harvest operations.

Western Forestry Graduate Research Symposium. Apr. 21, Corvallis, OR. pathways in southwestern Oregon. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. Dec. 12–16, SanFile Size: KB. Seeding is accomplished by artificial means, usually machine application of seed over extensive areas.

Alternatively, seeding may be accomplished by the natural distribution of seed from trees which are left following harvest of the timber. In the latter circumstance regeneration is, of course, a basic component of the silvicultural system.

Full text of "National Hydrology Workshop proceedings: Phoenix, Arizona, April May 1, " See other formats. Study hypotheses. Seasonal and temporal changes to 20 th century streamflow in the Salt River, Arizona that were hypothesized to be the result of (a) forest management and (b) warming.

Increases in forest density due to forest management policy of fire suppression [] assumed to occur across full ses in temperature due to human activities Cited by: 4.

Forested catchments throughout the world are known for producing high quality water for human use. In the 20th Century, experimental forest catchment studies played a key role in studying the processes contributing to high water quality.

The hydrologic processes investigated on these paired catchments have provided the science base for examining water quality responses to Cited by: 7. The LKL watershed has been and continues to be actively managed for timber harvest. In contrast to many areas of New England that experienced early forest clearance and conversion to cropland or pasture in the 17 th th centuries (Foster and Aber, ), the remoteness of the watershed minimized human impacts prior to the late Euro-American visitors were Author: Timothy L.

Cook, Noah P. Snyder, W. Wyatt Oswald, W. Wyatt Oswald, Kay Paradis. Klamath Mountains The Klamath Mountains of southwest Oregon have been separated as a subregion based on their complex geologic formation, with related problems of mass movement, surface soil erosion and forest regeneration following timber harvest.

Planning timber harvesting operations to reduce soil and water problems in humid tropic steeplands, pp. 24– In: Proceedings of a symposium on forest harvesting in Southeast Asia.

Forest Engineering Inc. and Oregon State Univ. College of Forestry, Corvallis, OR. United States. Forest Service: Changes in streamflow following timber harvest in southwestern Oregon / (Portland, Or.: Dept.

of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, ), also by R. Dennis Harr, Jack Rothacher, R. Fredriksen, and Or.) Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. Temporal and spatial changes in soil carbon and nitrogen after clearcutting and burning of an old-growth Douglas-fir forest / (Portland, Or.: U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, []), by Joseph A. Antos (page images at HathiTrust). Keppeler, E.T. and Lewis, J.,Understanding the hydrologic consequences of timber harvest and roading: four decades of streamflow and sediment results from the Caspar Creek Experimental Watersheds, in Furniss, M.

and McCammon, M., eds., Advancing the fundamental sciences—A conference for Forest Service physical scientists: U.S.BLM and the Forest Service created a program in to extend the term of the high-bid contracts.

The intent was to give contract holders more time in which to harvest the timber, hoping that lumber prices would rise, and to blend high-bid and low-bid timber to soften the financial impact on the contract holders."[T]he Klamath Provinces of southwestern Oregon and northwestern California have forests that are highly fragmented by timber harvest." Id.

FWS concluded that: habitat loss and fragmentation appear to be significant threats to the fisher. Forested habitat in the Pacific coast region decreased by about million acres between and